Vocabulary: Graith in the Grith of the Garth Edition

weet: also wit or wot, to know (but in the context discovered, ‘come wind or weet,’ probably wet)
perdue: a soldier sent on an especially dangerous mission (fr. French, ‘forgotten’)
gare: in water, a pier; on land, a station; in a person, greed or miserliness
electuary: medicine mixed with sugar or honey for easier consumption
garth: a courtyard, esp. within a cloister; or, a hoop for children’s play
sendal: fine silk fabric used in the middle ages, or a garment of it
grith: in old English law, sanctuary provided by church or crown
troke: also troak or truck, to barter or trade, or the items traded
corrie: a bowl-like terrain feature formed by retreating glaciers
inexpugnable: unable to be overcome or driven away by force
eft: certain terrestrial newts or developmental stages thereof
syth: also sith, sithe, etc, relatives of sithence, meaning since
graith: equipment, or to equip, or to be equipped (graithed)
thrawart: stubborn and obstinate, or twisted and distorted
umbles: also numbles, the edible organs of animals
chrysoprase: gemlike green chalcedony
trisulk: also trisulc, triple-pronged
speer: also speir, to ask or inquire
capriped: having feet like a goat’s
sike: a small stream or ditch
jimp: scant or dainty
fico: a trifle, or a fig

Vocabulary: Return to Shender Edition

blackleg: one of several blackening diseases of plant and animal; or, a swindler in racing or sport
antinomian: believing morals are irrelevant to those already bound for heaven
espalier: a framework by which a plant is made to grow in a specific shape
jess: in falconry, a strap around a bird’s leg to which a leash attaches
varvel: in falconry, a ring with the owner’s name attached to a jess
lunette: in architecture or fortification, a half-moon-shaped space
equerry: in a royal household, the officer in charge of the horses
cresset: a pendant or mounted metal cup used as a brazier
dree: a tedious or dreary noise, or to suffer hearing one
ukase: an order by absolute authority, esp. a czar’s
drysalter: a dealer of dry chemicals and dyes
delate: to inform or report, esp. to denounce
disembogue: to discharge or pour forth
shend: to reproach, shame, or injure
prevenient: before or in advance of
vermeil: vermilion, or gilded metal
yegg: a safecracker or burglar
izard: a Pyrenean antelope
langret: a loaded die
hautboy: an oboe

Vocabulary: Writhen Shine Edition

blackleg: in labor, a scab; in cards, a cheat; in zoology and botany, a bacterial or fungal disease
fettle: condition; or, to finish a cast piece or repair a furnace by removing extra material
espalier: a shrub or tree grown flat against a wall, or the framework used to do so
caducity: the quality of frailness or elderliness, or being transitory or perishable
poll evil: a condition among horses in which the back of the head swells
revetment: angled fortification to absorb the force from a body of water
marcescent: withering but not yet dropping (e.g. leaves in early fall)
withes: supple twigs or rope made from such; also spelled withies
electrolier: a chandelier with electric lights rather than candles
dottle: the plug of ash and tobacco left in a pipe after smoking
hod-me-dod: a snail, or a girl’s curls. In Norfolk, a hedgehog.
carlin: in Scotland, an old woman; also, a pug
cairngorm: a smoky yellow or dark quartz
enfeoff: to grant someone a feudal estate
fulgurant: like lightning, flashy or dazzling
writhen: twisted, wound, or cortorted
swot: scholar or studious person
yegg: a burglar or safecracker

Vocabulary: Patternity Tectht Edition

talapoins: small African monkey with olive fur and webbed hands; or in Thailand, a monk
santon: a certain type of Muslim monk or hermit, sometimes regarded as akin to a saint
calcine: to heat a metal and achieve reduction or drying, often leaving a residue, calx
wenny neck: having or resembling a fatty cyst (wen); or, an overcrowded large city
antimacassar: protective covering for the top or back of upholstered furniture
parterre: patterned flower garden; or rear, ground-level seats in a theater
brickbat: piece of brick used as a weapon; or, a blunt criticism or remark
macadamize: to pave using broken stone (macadam) and asphalt or tar
palempore: Indian bed covering or cloth, often with a flower pattern
aigrets: ornament made of or resembling a plume (i.e. of an egret)
tamarisk: shrub with small leaves and light pink flowers
serail: women’s living quarters in old Islamic society
tecthtrevan: mobile throne reserved for royalty
rede: advice or interpretation (or to provide it)
apricate: to sunbathe or expose to sunlight
giaour: derogatory term for a non-Muslim
mulct: to obtain by fraud; or, a small fine
sea fencibles: defensive naval units
tarradiddle: a trivial falsehood
dwimmer: illusion or magic

Vocabulary: Byrny Bro Edition

aludel: bulbous glass vessel open at both ends used to collect condensates
roundelay: poem with a regularly repeated phrase; also, a circular dance
athanor: steady-temperature heating element for chemistry or alchemy
fazart: hermaphroditic fowl; also, a weakling or coward (also faisard)
meacock: a meek, effeminate, or henpecked man (meek + peacock)
smaragd: emerald (from lat. smaragdus, to flash or shoot lightning)
brail: small ropes used to haul in a sail, or a small net for fishing
byrny: chain mail shirt covering the upper arms to below waist
misprision: failure of office, especially in preventing treason
cymophane: a translucent yellow gem in the beryl family
thripping: snapping one’s fingers (onomatopoeic)
gramercy: exclamation of thanks or emotion
haskardly: coarse, unpolished, or vulgar
carcanet: decorative women’s circlet
stour: turmoil, conflict, or dust cloud
matrass: long-necked glass flask
greengage: a type of green plum
mediamnis: canal or dyke (lat.)
supervivid: surviving (arch.)
footling: trifling or silly
sithence: since (arch.)
colubrine: snakelike
cupshotten: drunk

Vocabulary: Picul of Pulque Edition

cotter: part used to fix two other parts together or otherwise prevent their motion
sprue: channel in a mold through which molten metal flows; or, a tropical disease
wickiup: a simple (often Native American) hut or shelter made of mats or brush
skiffle: jazz or rock-derived music using improvised instruments; or, a light rain
replevin: recovery of goods unlawfully taken (security deposit often required)
malversation: improper professional behavior, esp. in public office
manciple: steward of provisions for a monastery, college, or court
sizar: a student at Cambridge or Trinity receiving an allowance
spancel: the act of or knotted rope used in hobbling an animal
yamen: in imperial China, the office or residence of an official
fard: facial cosmetics, esp. white, or the act of applying them
pulque: lightly alcoholic fermented drink made from agave
pampooties: rawhide slippers worn in the Aran islands
scrog: short or naturally stunted trees or undergrowth
thrapple: the windpipe, or to throttle (it, presumably)
catty: a Chinese weight measure of about 680g/1.5lb
archimandrite: head of one or several monasteries
corposant: St. Elmo’s Fire (lit. ‘holy body’)
diffide: to distrust or act distrustfully
picul: 100 catties

Vocabulary: Weel Talk Edition

quiddity: the essence of or a distinctive feature of something, or a trifling legal issue
emprise: an endeavor or exploit, or the qualities that drive one to them
squail: to throw something awkwardly, esp. weighted sticks at animals
malanders: blisters or crusty eruptions on a horse’s neck or knee
madstone: a stone believed to have antivenomous properties
quintain: a target set up for knights to tilt at, or the sport itself
keelpin: a small peg on cargo that locks it in place in the hold
gastine: a wasteland or desert, or the pillaging of something
erysipelas: a skin infection also known as “St Anthony’s fire”
pritchel: a punch or shaping tool used in metalworking
plethoric: overabundant, in blood or just in general
turves: plural of turf; units or blocks of peat
glede: archaic name for the red kite, a bird
opiparous: sumptuous or luxurious
snite: to blow or wipe one’s nose
eyot: an island, variant of ait
colophony: rosin or resin
weel: a deep pool
ratchel: gravel

Vocabulary: Toper th’ Merlon to ye edition

gamboge: resin used as yellow pigment or purgative, from Cambodia (‘gambogia’)
cofferdam: temporary waterproof enclosure for working below a waterline
johannine: relating to or characteristic of the apostle John or his gospel
obsequy: deferential behavior when singular, funeral rites when plural
actinic: related to or able to trigger light-activated chemical changes
merlon: the solid part between the gaps of a crenelated battlement
proa: Malaysian sailboat with triangular sail and single outrigger
invultuation: to create a likeness or effigy, esp. in witchcraft
sardonyx: onyx with layers of sard, a type of chalcedony
lobtail: when a whale strikes its flukes on the water
darbies: cuffs or manacles (also ‘double-darbies’)
rowel: the spiked wheel at the end of a spur
spinet: small upright piano or harpsichord
sporran: pouch worn on the front of a kilt
kentledge: scrap metal used as ballast
synoptic: adjective form of synopsis
lethiferous: lethal; inviting death
pule: to whine or whimper
ophidian: serpent-related
anent: about or regarding
toper: frequent drinker
gargarize: gargle
maukin: hare

Vocabulary: Midleaf Crasis Edition

surcingle: belt worn with a cassock; also one used to strap burdens to horses
crasis: blending or mingling; also combining two vowels into one sound
pasquil: also pasquinade, a satire or lampoon, usually posted publicly
poetaster: an inferior poet (-aster is a universal pejorative suffix)
aerolite: a meteorite, esp. one composed of silicates
caoutchouc: also cauchauc, archaic term for rubber
appetence: desire, appetite, affinity, or tendency
hibernian: relating to Ireland, or an Irish person
chark: to create charcoal, or the material itself
jakes: an outhouse or other outdoors lavatory
wain: an open-topped wagon or cart
collogue: to secretly conspire or plot
putid: morally or chemically corrupt
propugn: to defend or advocate for
harridan: a scolding woman or nag
succade: candied citrus peel
quondam: former, erstwhile
imposthume: an abscess
trivant: truant

Vocabulary: Crepitation Station Edition

lemniscate: like the Ôł× symbol, two closed symmetrical loops that meet at a central node
cincture: to encircle or surround, or something that does (e.g. a belt or girdle)
corant: corruption of courante, a fast 17th c. dance (fr. French, courir, to run)
talus: a slope or sloping fortification, or piled rocky detritus at its base
odylic: relating to the od, a hypothetical universal force in nature
loess: a light, fine, wind-deposited accumulation of silt and clay
esker: a winding ridge of sand or gravel often left by meltwater
glyptal: trademarked resin used for coatings (glycerol phthalic)
burren: area of the Irish coast famous for its caves and ruins
katabatic: winds naturally blowing downhill (ant. anabatic)
mortice: a hole cut in wood, to be jointed with a tenon
searce: to sift finely, or a sieve through which to do so
penetralia: innermost recesses or most secret items
jaggery: brown sugar made from date palm sap
flaysome: frightening (northern English dialect)
├ęclaircissement: enlightenment or clarification
coir: coconut fiber used for rope or matting
strathspey: a slow Scottish dance in 4/4
oupire: Polish variation on the vampire
crepitate: to crackle, rattle, or rustle